Posts Tagged With: configure

Mac OS X: Handy Tips, Tricks and Tweaks you may not know about… the Dock

Tip 1: Tweak your Dock

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Many people don’t realise that you can put any application, file or folder straight in to your Dock for easy access.  It’s really simple!

So (as many people already know) for applications you can either:

a.) Open your Applications folder and drag the app into your Dock (it must be on the left-hand side of the dotted dividing line)

or,

b.) When the app is open and running, right click on the icon that appears in the dock and select

Options > Keep in Dock

Screen shot 2013-07-19 at 15.13.40

And for files and folders:

Simply drag and drop them in to the Dock (they must be on the right-hand side of the dotted dividing line).

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Tip 2: Keep your Applications Folder handy

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Categories: Mac, Mac & OS X, Macbook Pro | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Taking Screenshots on a Mac

How to take Ordinary Screenshots

There are several options for taking screenshots on a Mac. They save by default to your desktop but you can probably change this if you want.

a.) Full Screen

To just take a screenshot of the whole screen (you can crop it later using GIMP or Photoshop or even Preview) just use:

cmd+shift+3

b.) Selected Area

To take a screenshot of a selected part of the screen use:

cmd+shift+4

After you have pressed these 3 keys you will be able to select the area you want. As soon as you let go it will take the shot so there isn’t much scope for resizing.

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Categories: Mac & OS X | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Changing File/Folder Permissions and Privileges in OS X

Sometimes you want to move a file or folder from another computer to your Mac. And every time you want to change the information, move it or change it in any way it wants you to give Admin permission.

Every single time!

How annoying!

This is because the permissions for whatever reason are set to Read only. A good way to check is to see if you can rename it by clicking on the name. If you can’t it’s probably Read only. You can also check by right clicking on the file or folder and clicking Get Info. Check the Sharing & Permissions at the bottom of the window.

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a.) Changing the Permissions for a File or Folder

To change your Permissions/Privileges just click where it says Read only and change the settings to Read & Write.

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b.) Changing the Permissions for multiple files or folders

So method a.) is fine for one or two files or folders but what if you have ten or twenty or a couple of hundred? For months I did this painstakingly for each file and folder, muttering dark curses against stupid user privileges for ordinary files… until I found out that there is actually a way of doing this!!!

To change the Permissions of multiple files or folders:

  • Open a finder window showing the folder CONTAINING all the folders/files you want to change
  • Right click on the folder and select Get Info
  • Unlock all Settings by clicking on the lock in the bottom right corner and type your Admin username and password
  • Click where it says Read only and change it to Read & Write
  • Click the Settings button and choose Apply to enclosed items

  • It will ask if you are sure and warn you that you can’t undo this action, so click OK (if you are sure)

  • Click the lock again to lock the Settings again

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Now you can change the name and extension of all the files in that folder and move them wherever you want without being asked for your Admin details all the time. Hurrah!

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Categories: Mac & OS X | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Configuring the Language & Text Settings on a Mac

This is obviously not a problem for everyone, but for those who type in different languages it might be useful. All the settings for language input are in System Preferences, to edit them go to:

Apple mark (in the top menubar) > System Preferences > Language & Text

a.) Language tab

Pretty straightforward, just arrange the languages in the order you use them.

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b.) Input Sources tab

This is the important one. Select all the input methods you use. I use Japanese so I have selected Kotoeri which is the input method for Japanese characters on a Mac. Then within the Kotoeri sub-menu I choose the methods I prefer to use. I also like to have Unicode available just in case.

I always have my language input menu in my menu bar so I can see what language my keyboard is set to at any time. To do that you just click the box that says Show input menu in menu bar. Then it will show up like this:

c.) Language Hotkeys

If you want to change your hotkeys you can either click the button on the Input Sources tab or go to:

Apple mark > System Preferences > Keyboard

Click the Keyboard Shortcuts tab and from the side menu select Keyboard & Text Input. The ones you want are the bottom two


To change the hotkeys to suit you just double click on the current key combination and type the keys you want to change to. Make sure you hold down the keys otherwise it will just take the first key you press. It saves automatically.

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Categories: Mac & OS X | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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