Posts Tagged With: connect

How to Stop iDevices Syncing Automatically

This is a stupid thing to set on default.  Why should my Apple devices automatically do this without me asking them to?  It’s a bit like someone who you have invited to your house randomly going through your stuff without asking and then chucking some of it out of the window. 

Yes, it’s true, all sorts of things can get deleted or overwritten through an automatic sync. 

So stupid… GRRR…

Anyway how to prevent this happening is a useful thing to know so I thought I’d write a quick post about it.

 

So, to ensure that iTunes does NOT sync devices automatically…

1.)  Go to the iTunes Preferences

2.)  Under the Devices tab tick the box that says:

Prevent iPods, iPhones and iPads syncing automatically

devices menu

3.) Click OK.

Yes, it really is that simple.  Of course, if you find later you want your iDevice to do this just untick the box. 

 

NOTE: if you want to use software that is not iTunes to access your iDevice it is better to tick this box just in case.

Categories: iPhone, Mac, Mac & OS X, Macbook Pro | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Kobo Touch Crash Fix

I am not having a good week with technology – my Mac HD failed (again) and my Kobo just crashed. My Mac I got fixed using AppleCare, which I found out expires tomorrow!! Yes, I’m living on the edge, cutting it pretty fine!!! (x_x;)

But my Kobo was another story.  It has never crashed before and I felt a bit at a loss.  But then practical thinking kicked in and I actually managed to fix it in less than 10 minutes.  My solution is at the bottom of the page, but one of these other less violent methods may work for you.

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Symptoms

So the symptoms were as follows:

  • Kobo Touch stuck on one page
  • No response from touching the screen
  • No response from pressing the Home button
  • No response from sliding the Power button for 5, 10 or 30 seconds
  • No response from connecting to power supply (just green charging light)

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Methods to Try

I tried these things first, as recommended by many users.

1. A Basic or Standard Reset

This will just reboot the device. 

(You are meant to turn your device off before doing this but generally the reason you are doing a reset is because the device won’t respond.  The people who write these instructions probably didn’t think that far.  Anyway.)

To do this:

1.) Turn off (if you can).

2.) Locate the tiny reset button which is either at the top near the power button or on the bottom of your Kobo.

3.) Use a piece of wire or a paperclip or a mechanical pencil and press the button down until you feel it click.

4.) Your Kobo should restart.

(This didn’t work for me.  My Kobo power light just flashed blue twice and then the light went dark again.  The screen was still stuck on the same page.)

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2. A Factory Reset

This wipes your device and restores it to the Factory settings.

To do this:

1.) Turn off (if you can).

2.) Slide the Power button and press the Home button at the same time. The Power light should start flashing blue.

3.) Keep holding both buttons until you see your device screen restarting itself.

(As above, this didn’t work for me. My Kobo power light just flashed blue a few more times and then the light went dark again.  The screen was still stuck on the same page.)

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3. Connecting to a Computer

Sometimes this can jump start the device, shocking it into responding.  Just connect using your cable and see if anything changes.

(As before, this didn’t work for me. My Kobo didn’t even acknowledge the connection and neither did my Mac.)

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4. My Solution

Sometimes all your device needs is a good kick up the backside. 

At this point I got a bit annoyed and disconnected my Kobo from my Mac. And then proceeded as follows:

1.) Connect your Kobo cable to your laptop (PC, Mac, whatever computer you have available) but not to your device.

2.) Get a good grip on your device and push the cable connector into the Kobo with a certain amount of force (but obviously not so much it damages the device).

3.) Hold the cable connector and continue to apply pressure (but again not so much it damages the device).

My device responded after about 10 seconds and went to the usual “do you wish to connect to this computer” screen.
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NOTE:

After I ejected my Kobo and disconnected from my Mac, the screen locked for a few minutes and went completely blank.  However, I slid the power button to turn it off and then turned it back on again and it was fine.

It seems OK now. Turns on and off, sleeps, all my books are still there and responding, my home button works…  A very strange glich. 

However all’s well that ends well (^-^)b
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AND AN EXTRA NOTE IF ALL ELSE FAILS…
Recently I was actually given a Kobo Touch to fix that failed with all of the above. However I managed to jump start it by using my solution above but connected to a mains socket rather than a computer. 

I would only recommend this method if all other options have failed as it could potentially kill your device completely. 

I used the usb plug adapter that came with my iPhone and a surge protected plugboard.  The device took much longer to respond (maybe up to 40 seconds of pressure) and a few attempts (although this may just be that I did not try for long enough at first). But yes, if you are willing to take the chance give it a whirl.  The owner said all her books were still there and it has been working fine ever since, so could be worth it.

P.S. If you have gone through this and managed to recover your ebooks, I recommend you back up your books using Calibre.  You can use Calibre to make a library of the ebooks on your Kobo and store them on your computer.  Plus you can then back up the whole library to an external drive so you have them saved if your HD fails.  If you are interested have a look at my post (btw Calibre is freeware):

https://thoughtsviewsopinions.wordpress.com/2012/11/04/free-ereader-software-calibre/

 

Categories: e-Books & e-Readers, e-Readers, Kobo Touch | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 18 Comments

How I Chose my Wacom Bamboo Tablet + Thoughts after 3 weeks of using the Wacom Bamboo Fun Pen and Touch

About a year ago I decided that, although I am not a professional artist, I was ready to take the next step and purchase a graphics tablet.  But as graphics tablets are a rather expensive treat (especially in a time of recession) I decided to spend a year saving for it.  I therefore had a looooong time to do my research. 

To all those who are trawling sites and forums sifting every single dreg of information they possibly can:

I have been there, I have done that, and I have got the T-shirt, or rather, in this case, the graphics tablet. 

My first problem was that I didn’t know anyone who had a graphics tablet so I didn’t really know where to start.  So after reading countless recommendations for “first tablet” “tablet for beginners” “tablets for amateur artists” etc. I found that overall the Wacom Bamboo series had the most recommendations. 

But here I encountered my first problem.  I found that the highest number of recommendations within the Wacom Bamboo series went to the Bamboo Create, the Bamboo Capture, the Bamboo Pen and Touch, and the Bamboo Fun Pen and Touch (small and medium versions). 

But nowhere could I find any people who reviewed the Bamboo Create AND the Bamboo Fun Pen and Touch!!

It seems silly that I did not make the obvious connection at the time, which is, of course, they are the same graphics tablet!!!  Yes, it’s true.  The bundled software may be different but the tablet and its features are the same.  Continue reading

Categories: Art & Design, Graphics Tablets, Reviews | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 18 Comments

Information About the Wacom Bamboo Series

Firstly, if you are looking for an account of how I chose my Wacom Bamboo tablet from the Wacom Bamboo series, or a review of the Wacom Bamboo Fun Pen and Touch/Create, please read my post here.  If you are after a guide to registering and downloading the software bundled with your tablet please read my post here.

This post covers the differences between the various Bamboo tablets, the meaning of their product codes, and their equivalents worldwide.  This is a post informing you of the differences between the tablets, not a review of them.

The information here has been gathered from many sources including the official WACOM website.  Most of what I have written here can be found on the WACOM site in bits and pieces.  Mine is a more comprehensive and explicit summary of what is written there, on other websites, and in forums and customer reviews. Continue reading

Categories: Art & Design, Graphics Tablets, Reviews | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments

Airport Problems? Here are some possible solutions.

Recently I had a couple of problems with my Airport (or Mac wireless internet connection).  So in case anyone else is having similar problems I will report my findings here.

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I was trying to connect to a new wireless network, which I had always found pretty straightforward to be honest.  I had all the network names and passwords and knew whether it was WPA or WEP and so on.  I also knew it was a closed network so it wouldn’t show up in the Select Airport Network window.

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Solution One.

My first mistake was adding a closed network as an ordinary network.  My Mac couldn’t find the network at all.  So Solution One: If you are using a private closed network help your Mac by adding the network as a closed network.

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Adding a Closed Network

So for those who don’t know how to add a closed internet network, there are several different ways.  (For those who know how this works, please skip this by clicking HERE.)  The way I do it is:

1.) Open Network Preferences, either through System Preferences > Network

or using the Network icon in your toolbar.

2.) First click the lock in order to allow yourself to make changes.  Unless you are Admin you will have to authenticate this.  Then click the Assist me… button.

3.)  You will be given the options Cancel, Diagnostics and Assistant in a drop down window.  Choose Diagnostics.

4.) You are then asked to choose the Location of your network, e.g. Home, Work etc., then click Continue.

5.)  You are then asked to choose the type of network port (in general, Airport [wireless] or Ethernet [wired] ) you want to use.  So for wireless choose Airport and then clickContinue.

6.)  A closed network is private and therefore not visible in the available networks window.  So instead choose Use Closed Network.

 

7.) In the next window you will be asked to write your Network Name, Wireless Security and your network Password.  Ensure you know if there are any capital letters as network passwords are case sensitive.  It is also important to know exactly what type of wireless security you are using (WPA, WEP etc.) otherwise you may not be able to connect even if the name and password are both correct.

and then click Continue.

Your Airport should now be connected to your specified network.

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Airport Connected but still no Internet Connection!

So having done all of the above I had my Airport connection up and running.  It told me I was connected to the network and could identify the IP address.  However there was no internet access at all either through Firefox or through Safari.

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Solution Two.

Ensure that your DNS (Domain Name Server) servers are correct.  To find out exactly what your DNS servers are you should ring your ISP (Internet Service Provider).  In very basic terms, your Internet Service Provider is the company you pay every month to provide you with your internet connection.  For example, some big name ISPs are companies like AOL (global), Pacific Internet (Asia), Internode (Australia), Softbank (Japan), BT (UK), etc.  For more information about ISPs have a look at the Wikipedia page below.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_service_provider

Once you know what they are (usually there are 2 – a main server and a backup), check they are correct by going into Network Preferences and then clicking Advanced.

You can see your current DNS servers under the DNS tab.  To add new DNS servers click the little + button at the bottom and type in the four sets of numbers.  In some cases there may only be one server, but usually there are two.  If your server is incorrect just add the correct server in the same way as adding a new server.

Categories: Mac & OS X | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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