Posts Tagged With: display

Mac OS X: Handy Tips, Tricks and Tweaks you may not know about… the Dock

Tip 1: Tweak your Dock

o

Many people don’t realise that you can put any application, file or folder straight in to your Dock for easy access.  It’s really simple!

So (as many people already know) for applications you can either:

a.) Open your Applications folder and drag the app into your Dock (it must be on the left-hand side of the dotted dividing line)

or,

b.) When the app is open and running, right click on the icon that appears in the dock and select

Options > Keep in Dock

Screen shot 2013-07-19 at 15.13.40

And for files and folders:

Simply drag and drop them in to the Dock (they must be on the right-hand side of the dotted dividing line).

divide

o

Tip 2: Keep your Applications Folder handy

o Continue reading

Categories: Mac, Mac & OS X, Macbook Pro | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

How to Read Japanese (and other non Latin based alphabets) on a Kobo

Recently I was asked by my Dad to test whether a Japanese eBook would work on my Kobo Touch. He said he saw various online sites which confirmed it was possible to display Japanese as long as you had the right fonts installed. So I had a look at one of the sites. Here’s the link:

http://atouchofkobo.wordpress.com/2011/08/28/260/

The font on this site is a version of Unicode developed by GNU.  It is therefore free and opensource.  The idea of Unicode is to provide a unique number to every individual character regardless of platform, program or language.

Unicode is developed by a non-profit organisation and is supported by many major companies, including Apple and Microsoft. You can read more about it here

Anyway, the GNU Unifont can be downloaded from the developer’s site here

or from the site listed earlier on which the author has kindly provided their own link.

I can confirm that this unicode font does work with Japanese.  I also tested it with a few other random languages and I can confirm that it works with Chinese (which I can’t read properly but I can recognise the characters) and displays Hebrew (which I can’t read at all).

So for anyone who wants to get this working on their Kobo, here’s a quick guide. Continue reading

Categories: e-Books & e-Readers, e-Readers, Kobo Touch | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How to Show Mounted Drives on your Desktop by Default

It can be a problem remembering which discs are currently mounted and which ones you have unmounted (ejected).  When I first got my Macbook Pro I wasn’t used to unmounting things and was constantly removing external drives physically without thinking. 

This is not only annoying because of the nagging reminder

but it’s also bad for your Mac.

By default OS X does not show mounted drives on your desktop.

But I think having them visible is the easiest way to keep track of what you’ve got mounted.  Especially seeing as a drive can be unmounted but still physically plugged in to your Mac.  That way you can actually physically see the devices that need to be ejected.

o

So, to avoid the stupid “disk not ejected properly” extravaganza…

The solution is really simple – just set OS X to show all the drives which are mounted by default.

1.)  Click on Finder.

2.)  Go to Finder > Preferences

3.)  Select the drives you want to have visible.

I don’t actually have my “Hard disks” visible as I never mount or unmount internal HDs.  But with my current settings (above) all external items – phones, cameras, iPods, external HDDs, DVDs, CDs etc. – show up as icons on my desktop.

Now you can see exactly what’s going on with your drives. 

Plus you never have to see that annoying message ever again. 

Hooray!

Categories: Mac, Mac & OS X, Macbook Pro | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Blog at WordPress.com.