Posts Tagged With: change

How to Use the Extras on the Kobo Touch

I mentioned previously that you can write notes and play Sudoku on a Kobo Touch.  And a request came up about how exactly you find the Sudoku and other extras. 

So, here we go. 

1.)  Press the Home tab and from there choose Settings

2.)  At the bottom of the Settings Menu choose Extras

3.)  You have three options:

a.)  Launch Sketchbook

– you can use this to write quick handwritten notes with your finger. 

b.) Launch Sudoku

– yes, you can play Sudoku

c.) Launch Browser

– use your Kobo to browse the internet (you have to have your wireless enabled) 

o

When using the Sudoku you have four different levels of difficulty to choose from: SIMPLE, EASY, MEDIUM and HARD. 

To change the difficulty simply click the third (lowest) button on the bottom right of your Sudoku game screen.  This is also the button you use to quit in the middle of a game, although I usually just use the HOME button.

Advertisements
Categories: e-Readers, Kobo Touch | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Changing File/Folder Permissions and Privileges in OS X

Sometimes you want to move a file or folder from another computer to your Mac. And every time you want to change the information, move it or change it in any way it wants you to give Admin permission.

Every single time!

How annoying!

This is because the permissions for whatever reason are set to Read only. A good way to check is to see if you can rename it by clicking on the name. If you can’t it’s probably Read only. You can also check by right clicking on the file or folder and clicking Get Info. Check the Sharing & Permissions at the bottom of the window.

o

a.) Changing the Permissions for a File or Folder

To change your Permissions/Privileges just click where it says Read only and change the settings to Read & Write.

o

o

b.) Changing the Permissions for multiple files or folders

So method a.) is fine for one or two files or folders but what if you have ten or twenty or a couple of hundred? For months I did this painstakingly for each file and folder, muttering dark curses against stupid user privileges for ordinary files… until I found out that there is actually a way of doing this!!!

To change the Permissions of multiple files or folders:

  • Open a finder window showing the folder CONTAINING all the folders/files you want to change
  • Right click on the folder and select Get Info
  • Unlock all Settings by clicking on the lock in the bottom right corner and type your Admin username and password
  • Click where it says Read only and change it to Read & Write
  • Click the Settings button and choose Apply to enclosed items

  • It will ask if you are sure and warn you that you can’t undo this action, so click OK (if you are sure)

  • Click the lock again to lock the Settings again

o

Now you can change the name and extension of all the files in that folder and move them wherever you want without being asked for your Admin details all the time. Hurrah!

o

Categories: Mac & OS X | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Configuring the Language & Text Settings on a Mac

This is obviously not a problem for everyone, but for those who type in different languages it might be useful. All the settings for language input are in System Preferences, to edit them go to:

Apple mark (in the top menubar) > System Preferences > Language & Text

a.) Language tab

Pretty straightforward, just arrange the languages in the order you use them.

o

b.) Input Sources tab

This is the important one. Select all the input methods you use. I use Japanese so I have selected Kotoeri which is the input method for Japanese characters on a Mac. Then within the Kotoeri sub-menu I choose the methods I prefer to use. I also like to have Unicode available just in case.

I always have my language input menu in my menu bar so I can see what language my keyboard is set to at any time. To do that you just click the box that says Show input menu in menu bar. Then it will show up like this:

c.) Language Hotkeys

If you want to change your hotkeys you can either click the button on the Input Sources tab or go to:

Apple mark > System Preferences > Keyboard

Click the Keyboard Shortcuts tab and from the side menu select Keyboard & Text Input. The ones you want are the bottom two


To change the hotkeys to suit you just double click on the current key combination and type the keys you want to change to. Make sure you hold down the keys otherwise it will just take the first key you press. It saves automatically.

o

Categories: Mac & OS X | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Solution for Volume Problems in OS X

o

For reference, I am using Snow Leopard, 10.6.8, on a Macbook Pro.  I don’t use external speakers, just the normal built in ones.

Recently, I had some problems with the volume in OS X. The symptoms were as follows: 

– the volume keys on the keyboard (F10, F11, F12) stopped working 

– if I pressed the volume keys they made the “plick” sound but the sound level did not increase or decrease or change in any way even when at full volume or muted

– although the volume indicator appeared on the screen showing that the buttons were working (as the volume bars increased or decreased), this had no effect on the actual sound volume itself

– the volume icon in the menu bar at the top had no effect on the volume

Strangely, I could control the volume perfectly using the System Preferences sound controls.  So clearly the volume was not broken. 

As far as I can tell this problem only occurs when use headphones or my graphics tablet.  I’m no expert but I think my poor Mac just gets confused about how it should allow the volume to be controlled.  For example, when I used my headphones to listen to music in iTunes I had all the above symptoms BUT for some reason I could still use iTunes to control the volume (as well  as being able to control the volume using System Preferences.  This is how I solve the problem when it occurs.  A lot of this may not be relevant but I’ll include it all as I’m not sure which bits are key to the solution. 

o
Step 1.  Go to System Preferences > Sound


o

Step 2.  On the Output Tab make sure your settings are correct for your system.  These are my settings:

I use my built-in speakers and use the audio port for Sound Output

o
Step 3.  This step is not  technically necessary, but in case it affects anything these are my settings on my Sound Effects tab.

I always set my master volume quite high and and make sure the Play feedback when volume is changed is ticked.  This makes sure that when you reboot you can hear if your volume problem is fixed or not.  

P
Step 4.  Remove any USBs or headphones you may have connected. 

P
Step 5.  Restart your Mac. 

P
Step 6.  Sign in as Admin and check your settings for Sound in System Preferences, and whether the volume controls (keys, menu bar etc.) are working properly.  If they are all OK then you should find that they are also working properly in all the other user accounts.

Categories: Mac & OS X | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How to change font style, size and colour in WordPress.com

There are many helpful posts about this on the WordPress Support.  But trawling through scores of posts to find a specifically relevant AND detailed one can be a bit of a nightmare.  So I thought I’d write a post on it myself.

*****************

o
Using HTML in WordPress.com

Most themes in WordPress.com have an inbuilt font.  This means that however much you change the colour and things they often revert to the default theme.  With other things you don’t have the options available in the default WordPress.com Edit Post screen.  But you can override all this by using HTML.

In order to change your text style, size etc. you need to use HTML tags.  A lot of posts tell you this. And then don’t tell you how to switch to the HTML side of things.  Yay, helpful!

In order to use HTML you have to click the right hand tab labelled Text on the Edit Post page. 

So, to completely avoid all and any misunderstandings or confusion, I will write down all the details.  If you know the tabs I mean just skip this.

Go to Dashboard > Post

then go to the post you want to edit and click Edit.  You should now be on the Edit Post page. 

There are two tabs to choose from when you’re editing your posts:

Visual (default normal tab)

or Text (HTML tab)

.

Now onwards to the actual editing!
.
o
> Changing the Font Style

If you want to change your text font style and you are handy with font names then you don’t need to use these resources.  If you are not sure of the names of the fonts you want there are some handy resources at Wavian.com  It’s a page with links and a decent font list with a good variety of styles.

There’s also a page discussing the standard web safe fonts here.  I personally don’t pay that much attention to whether they are standard or not as this blog is purely for my own amusement, but it depends what you need.

OK, so after finding out the name of the font you want go to the html tab (the text tab).  I will use,

“Once you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth.”

which is an amazing quote from the immortal Sherlock Holmes.

When you use HTML tags to change the font in WordPress.com you always need to remember to create an open tag and a close tag. So you always open with (span)* and close with (/span)*.

*NOTE: I have to substitute () in my tags as wordpress deletes them otherwise. You need to use

span

where I use (span) (/span).

For example, if I just want to change the font for the first part like this:

“Once you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth.”

I contain just that part in between the tags like this:

(span style=”font-family: lucida handwriting;”)”Once you eliminate the impossible,(/span)

o
o
> Changing the Font Size

In order to change the font size you use a similar tag.  For example, if I want to change the next part like this:
“Once you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth.”

I contain just that part in between the tags like this:

(span style=”font-size: large;”)whatever remains,(/span)
o

o
> Changing the Font Colour

In HTML every colour has its own code.  For example, Black is #000000, White is #FFFFFF, Red is #FF0000, Blue is #0000FF, and so on. There is a great resource called HTML Color Picker which you can use to find the HTML colour code you want.

In order to change the font colour, you again use a similar tag. For example, if I want to change the next part like this:

“Once you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth.”

I contain just that part in between the tags like this:

(span style=”color: #009999;”)no matter how improbable,(/span)
o
.
> Changing Font Style, Size and Colour

In order to change all of the above you need to include them all in one tag.  For example, if I want to change the final part like this:

“Once you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth.”

I contain just that part in between the tags like this:

(span style=”font-family: courier; font-size: x-large; color: #800000;”)must be the truth.”(/span)

o

*****************

So, things to remember about these HTML tags.

1.) Always remember to open with and close with (span) and (/span)*.
(see note abpve on replacing all brackets used in my tags!!!)

2.) Always remember to create a close tag.

3.)  Check your spelling!  Misspelled tags won’t work.

4.) If you are changing more than one thing, make sure that

  • the quotation marks “” include everything between the = and the >
  • each separate part (style/size/colour) is separated with a semicolon ;.

5.)  Remember, not all font styles and colours will work.  Trial and error is the best way to find out what works for you.

OK, that’s all from me.  Have fun HTML-ing.  Hope it goes well.

Categories: Using Wordpress.com | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

A Few Tips for Setting up a Mac/OS X


So I’m finally getting used to using OS X after about a year.  I spent a lot of that time shouting at my Macbook Pro for not being able to do things I consider to be mandatory.  So to save others the hours of hassle and frustrated shrieking, I’m writing a series of (hopefully) useful posts to guide unwary travellers along the path of the Mac.

*******************

Here’s a quick index:

1.) The Keyboard
2.) Configuring Right Click

o

1.) The Keyboard

The main differences between a Windows keyboard and a Mac keyboard are, a.) ctrl is no longer a main player, and b.) there is no delete key.

o

There are several symbols which are used to denote keys in OS X. The main ones are:

     Command (I think it used to be called the Apple Key)
     Alt/Option
     Ctrl

     Shift

   Caps

      Function

o

a.) Using COMMAND (cmd)

When using OS X, Command is pretty much your new ctrl key.  For example:

copy = cmd+c

paste = cmd+v

And crucially,

for selecting separate multiple items.

cmd+click

o

b.)  How to DELETE

Yes, probably obvious to most Mac users but I spent quite a long time feeling annoyed at the lack of this button.

delete = function (fn)+backspace

o

o

2.) Trackpad: How to Change the Settings for Right Click

This is probably only useful to Macbook Pro users but this was another button I missed during my first few Mac using weeks.  Obviously you can use a mouse, but I can’t always be bothered to take one with me.  So Trackpad it is.  Using the Trackpad there are two substitutes for Right Click and you can choose the one you prefer by going to

Apple Mark > System Preferences > Trackpad

You have 2 options, you can either a.) choose to click with one finger in a specific location of the Trackpad or b.) tap with 2 fingers anywhere on the Trackpad.  Depends what you prefer.  I think it’s easier to take the second option as you can tap or click anywhere on the Trackpad.

o

o

Categories: Mac & OS X, Macbook Pro | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Blog at WordPress.com.