Posts Tagged With: multiple

A Solution for Solving OS X System Font Issues

So if you are reading this I assume you are plagued by OS X’s inability to cope with having more than one copy of the same font installed. 

You can easily tell if this is your issue as you will be constantly annoyed by capital A boxes.  See the example below ↓

Screen shot 2014-07-07 at 21.12.56
I was quite worried when I first saw this but actually it is a very minor problem in terms of fixability.  I had been installing a lot of custom fonts earlier in the day so it wasn’t difficult to put 2 and 2 together as to what was causing it. 

Two things must ye know of this issue…

(Blackadder Season 2 quote – I couldn’t resist – the wise woman  conversation is one of the best scenes in the whole show)

First… Macs make a fuss if you install multiple versions of the same font.

Second… The default Mac font is Lucida Grande, so this is generally the culprit for the vast majority of issues.

So with this knowledge in hand let us continue.

Surprisingly, you don’t actually have to delete or uninstall anything (or at least I didn’t) to solve this problem.   You do have to ensure that you resolve the conflicting fonts though to ensure that the problem doesn’t keep reoccurring.  But don’t worry, my solution is pretty simple.

 

Step One: Resolving conflicting font issues

The easiest way to do this is by using Font Book.  Because Font Book is a default OS X install straight from Apple it will tell you exactly what your Mac is unhappy with.  So…

1.)  Fire up Font Book

Applications > Font Book

2.)  Make sure you have selected the All Fonts list, then go down the font list until you come to a font that has an issue – any font with a clash will have a yellow triangle next to it. 

FONT ISSUE

3.)  Right click on the font and from the drop down menu choose Resolve Duplicates.

Screen shot 2014-07-07 at 22.15.39

If the issue is successfully fixed the multiple versions of the font will be turned off. 

Screen shot 2014-07-07 at 22.15.49
Step Two: Making your Mac realise that you have solved the font issues

So in order for your Mac to actually acknowledge that you have sorted out your conflicting font issues you need to empty your font cache.  A simple restart does not do this (yes I did try it as I always prefer not to use sudo commands unless I have to).  Your Mac will not notice all your hard work resolving all the font conflicts except under duress.  So…

 NOTE: You need to be an Administrator in order to use a sudo command so change users if you are not currently logged in as one.

1.) Open a Terminal window.

Finder > Go > Utilities > Terminal

Screen shot 2014-07-07 at 23.06.25

Screen shot 2014-07-07 at 23.08.25

2.)  Close all the apps that are running then type or copy and paste the following command:

sudo atsutil databases -remove

Screen shot 2014-07-07 at 23.17.54

 

3.)  You will be asked for your admin password.  Type it in.  The cursor will not move as you type so be careful.

4.)  Once the command has run (you will see several lines of script) close Terminal and restart your computer.  It is important that you do this straight away.

And that’s it!

Hopefully you will now find your OS X all happy and font issue free!  Hooray!

Categories: Mac, Mac & OS X, Macbook Pro | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

How to Sync your iPhone to a new Mac without Erasing your Data (a complete step-by-step guide)

My Macbook Pro hard-drive failed recently.  It was only about a year and a half old and it just went down without warning.  No slowing of the system, no problems, no crashes.  It just died suddenly. 

Anyway, I had Apple Care so I got it fixed for free with a shiny new HD.  However, I lost all my settings including the data relating to my iPhone to iTunes sync.  I spent the last 3 months trying to get my iPhone and the new HD to talk to each other.  But every single thing I tried didn’t stop me getting the unbelievably irritating message:

iphone erase and restore

But my persistence has finally paid off and I have actually successfully synced my iPhone to my new HD.  And, I have of course beaten (and beaten deep into the ground) the stupid stupid annoying irritating erase and sync message. This fills me with a sense of pride and accomplishment.

While I was trying and failing to fix the problem I read many many different solutions and also many different ideas about which software to use and so on.  I also read countless times that it was not fixable and that I had to erase my iPhone.  Or that I had to jailbreak it.  In any case I did not find one clear cohesive step by step to solving this problem.

So I would like to share my solution in the hope that it will help other people get themselves out of this ridiculous situation.  This is my own complete and extremely detailed step by step guide to syncing an iPhone with a second/new Mac without losing/deleting/erasing any data. 

This solution does not require jailbreaking or anything of that nature, nor does it require you to erase anything from your iPhone.

And yes, this is EXACTLY what I did to get my iPhone to sync with my new HD and iTunes. Continue reading

Categories: Free Software, iPhone, Mac, Mac & OS X, Macbook Pro | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 27 Comments

Changing File/Folder Permissions and Privileges in OS X

Sometimes you want to move a file or folder from another computer to your Mac. And every time you want to change the information, move it or change it in any way it wants you to give Admin permission.

Every single time!

How annoying!

This is because the permissions for whatever reason are set to Read only. A good way to check is to see if you can rename it by clicking on the name. If you can’t it’s probably Read only. You can also check by right clicking on the file or folder and clicking Get Info. Check the Sharing & Permissions at the bottom of the window.

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a.) Changing the Permissions for a File or Folder

To change your Permissions/Privileges just click where it says Read only and change the settings to Read & Write.

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b.) Changing the Permissions for multiple files or folders

So method a.) is fine for one or two files or folders but what if you have ten or twenty or a couple of hundred? For months I did this painstakingly for each file and folder, muttering dark curses against stupid user privileges for ordinary files… until I found out that there is actually a way of doing this!!!

To change the Permissions of multiple files or folders:

  • Open a finder window showing the folder CONTAINING all the folders/files you want to change
  • Right click on the folder and select Get Info
  • Unlock all Settings by clicking on the lock in the bottom right corner and type your Admin username and password
  • Click where it says Read only and change it to Read & Write
  • Click the Settings button and choose Apply to enclosed items

  • It will ask if you are sure and warn you that you can’t undo this action, so click OK (if you are sure)

  • Click the lock again to lock the Settings again

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Now you can change the name and extension of all the files in that folder and move them wherever you want without being asked for your Admin details all the time. Hurrah!

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Categories: Mac & OS X | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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